Earl Grey Ice Cream (with eggs)

Earl Grey Ice Cream (with eggs)
Print Recipe
I found this variation on Icecreamscience.com and it turned out to be a creamier, richer version of the Earl Grey ice cream that inspired me to make ice cream at home in the first place. It takes forever to make it, but the result is worth it.
Servings Prep Time
2 quarts 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1 hour 30 hours
Servings Prep Time
2 quarts 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1 hour 30 hours
Earl Grey Ice Cream (with eggs)
Print Recipe
I found this variation on Icecreamscience.com and it turned out to be a creamier, richer version of the Earl Grey ice cream that inspired me to make ice cream at home in the first place. It takes forever to make it, but the result is worth it.
Servings Prep Time
2 quarts 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1 hour 30 hours
Servings Prep Time
2 quarts 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1 hour 30 hours
Ingredients
Servings: quarts
Instructions
Setting the freezer
  1. As with other ice creams, turn down the freezer temperature a few days before to it's lowest setting. This will help freeze the ice cream faster, creating smaller ice crystals offering a creamier texture. Ideally it should be about -13° F.
Freezing with dry ice
  1. Alternatively, you can use dry ice to freeze the cylinder. If you choose this method do not put it in the freezer, but in a styrofoam cooler. Make sure that the excess gas can escape or the cooler will explode. Dry ice is about -109° F so 4-6 hours should be sufficient time to freeze the cylinder to the ideal -20° F. Still colder is better, so if you have time shoot for -50° F
Stovetop method
  1. The size of the pan in this recipe is important to provide enough surface area for evaporation -- so use a 9-12" pan. By concentrating the mix, you increase the percentage of protein. Protein plays a significant role in limiting the size of ice crystals, thereby improving texture, so the higher the percentage of protein in your mix the better.
Immersion circulator method
  1. I chose this option the first time to keep the temperature at the exact right point. Basically set the water temp to 2-3° F above the 160.5° F goal and put the mixing bowl in the water as if it is a double boiler. I was able to attach the side of the bowl to the water container with a clip to keep it from falling in while mixing the base. I also used plastic wrap to seal the top of the container around the mixing bowl to keep the hot water from evaporating.
Heating the base
  1. Choose which method for heating then add the sugar and egg yolks to a pot or mixing bowl. Mix together to combine. The sugar will help keep the yolks from curdling.
  2. Add the cream and milk. Gently stir the mix before turning the heat on or adding to the water bath.
  3. Heat the mixture until the temperature reaches 158° F, then turn down the heat and continue heating until it reaches 160.5° F. Use a thermometer to keep the temperature at 160.5° F for 60 minutes. This will ensure that the whey proteins undergo reversible unfolding, but not aggregation, which will significantly improve the texture of the finished ice cream.
  4. When 30 minutes have passed fill a large bowl with ice and water. Add a few tablespoons of table salt to help lower the temperature of the ice water.
  5. Once you have heated the mix for 55 minutes, add the tea leafs and sea salt and continue heating for a further 5 minutes to help release the flavor from the tea leaves. Adding the leafs at the end will help reduce the loss of the volatile flavor compounds from the leafs.
  6. Heating the mix for 60 minutes may sound like a long time but it is a small price to pay for extremely creamy ice cream. Holding the mix at 160.5° F for 60 minutes will mean that you will concentrate the mix by about 32%. Concentrating the mix will increase the percentage of protein, which contributes significantly to a smooth and creamy texture.
Cooling the mix
  1. Carefully pour the heated mix into a Ziploc freezer bag.
  2. Once the mix has cooled to about 50° F, place it in the fridge and leave it there for 24 hours. It is important to allow enough time for the ice cream mix to age. Crystallization of fat during the ageing process helps maintain the shape of ice cream when it is served and also helps minimize the rate at which the ice cream melts. It is also important to age the mix for at least 24 hours to allow the flavor from the tea leaves to infuse the mix.
Churning the mix
  1. Strain the tea leaves from the mix with a sieve. Press on them with a spatula to extract as much liquid as possible.
  2. Remove the cylinder from the freezer or dry ice cooler. Place it in the machine and add the dasher. Put the lid on and, with the machine switched on, pour in the mix.
  3. As soon as you pour in the mix, use your thumb to push the dasher against the side of the bowl. Pushing the dasher against the side will prevent any ice from freezing to the side. Alternatively, use a spatula to scrape the ice from the side.

    Any ice that is frozen to the side of the bowl will act as an insulator, slowing the release of heat from the ice cream to the bowl. If the transfer of heat from the ice cream to the freezer bowl is reduced, the ice cream will take longer to freeze. The longer the ice cream takes to freeze, the larger the ice crystals will grow and the sandier the texture will be. Keep the dasher pushed against the side of the bowl until you have finished churning the mix (sore thumbs are an additional price to pay for smooth creamy ice cream).
  4. Use a spoon to push along any static lumps of ice cream. Any static lumps will start to melt, increasing the size of ice crystals, causing a sandy texture.
  5. After about 12-20 minutes, switch the machine off and quickly empty the mix into a pre-chilled container.

    The longer you take to empty the ice cream into the container, the longer the ice cream will spend at room temperature. At room temperature, ice crystals will start to quickly melt. If ice crystals melt, they will grow bigger when the ice cream is placed in the freezer. Therefore, the longer the ice cream spends at room temperature, the sandier the texture will be. Be as quick as you can when emptying the ice cream into the plastic container.
  6. Quickly place the container in the freezer. Make sure that there is enough space in your freezer for the air to circulate freely. The more cluttered your freezer, the longer it will take for the churned ice cream to reach -0.5° F and the bigger the ice crystals will get.

    At -0.5° F, it is recommended that homemade ice cream be kept for about a week. This is because some bacteria are still able to multiply at -0.5° F. Below -0.5° F, it becomes too cold for bacteria to multiply so ice cream can be kept for longer. Freezer cases in supermarkets are kept at or below -20° F, FYI.
  7. Ice crystals will continue to grow until the temperature drops to below -0.5° F. It is therefore critical to get the your ice cream into the freezer and down to below -0.5° F as quickly as possible to prevent a sandy and coarse texture from developing. It's recommended to leave the ice cream to harden in the freezer overnight -- or a minimum of 4 hours.
Serving the ice cream
  1. Once the mix has hardened, take the ice cream out of the freezer and let sit to thaw for between 5 to 10 minutes, or until it is soft enough to scoop. Serve the ice cream below 10° F. As the serving temperature is increased to 18° F, the flavor and sweetness will become more pronounced.
Recipe Notes

If you prefer a simpler, faster, easier version try Earl Grey Ice Cream (no eggs).

Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe